The International Organization for Migration (OIM) has released a summary snapshot of monitoring activities it conducted in collaboration with other border monitoring partners, at the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The monitoring was put in placefollowing the movements observed at the border before and after the 17th June 2015 expiration of the registration component of the National Plan for Regularization of Foreigners (PNRE in Spanish), established in the Dominican Republic. Monitoring of border movement began as of the first week of June 2015. Up until the 16th of June, figures are based on partial observations of border crossing points. The network’s current structure covers 100% of border crossing points as of July 2015.



CUMULATIVE2 HIGHLIGHTS3  26,892 households representing 49,217 individuals crossed the border into Haitian territory  35.2% were female while 64.8% were male  770 presumed unaccompanied minors were identified  2,043 households declared having been registered in the PNRE corresponding to 4,475 individuals  28,713 individuals declared having returned spontaneously to Haiti  9,480 individuals claim to have been deported  11,0244 individuals were officially deported at the three official border crossing points of Ouanaminthe, Malpasse, and Belladères and have been voluntary registered.

Of the 46,638 individuals monitored by the border monitoring network, 35.2% were female and 64.8% were male.


The majority of the returnee population reported being between the ages of 18-59 years old, with individuals from this age group representing 66.7% of the overall returning population. A reported 31.9% are aged 0-17 years old and 1.4% falls into the elderly category.


Among the persons crossing the border, the network encountered 770 cases of presumed unaccompanied minors. These cases were referred to the relevant government authorities (IBESR) and their partners for appropriate care and status determination.




Documentation

29.7% (14,596 individuals) of the returnees interviewed reported having Haitian Documentation, while 2.6% (1,271 individuals) reported having Dominican documentation. A reported 67.8% (33,350 individuals) did not possess any type of documentation.


The most common ID document presented by the returnee continues to be the Haitian Birth Certificate, corresponding to 68.9% of the individuals with documentation. The second most common document is the Haitian ID (CIN or NIF) which represents 21.9%.


The most common occupation within the DR held by returnees is agriculture (12,282 households), followed by construction (6,750 households) and commerce (2,956 households). Other declared occupations fall within transportation, hotel, maintenance, security, students, among others.


Entry on Haitian Territory Of all 49,217 individuals interviewed, 28,713 individuals declared having returned spontaneously to Haiti. While 9,480 individuals claimed to have been deported into Haitian territory by various DR authorities (Immigration, CESFRONT, Military etc.), 11,024 individuals have been officially deported by the DR Immigration (DGM).


Destination and Intentions When questioned regarding their intended destination, the following three communes have been most commonly indicated by returnees:  Cornillons/Grand Bois as indicated by 2,582 households  Anse-à-Pitres as indicated by 1,973 households  Fonds-Verettes as indicated by 1,427 households.


Irrespective of the type of returns, the trends observed during previous SitReps remain the same. The returnees have, most commonly, provided the following answers  Intention to stay with relatives.  Intention to rent a house  Having nowhere to go  Intention to stay with Friends  Intention to go to In a settlement/camp Individuals born in the Dominican Republic Of all returnees, 3,856 households (corresponding to 15,456 individuals) have at least one member who was born in the Dominican Republic. More specifically, this corresponds to a total of 8,357 individuals born in the DR, 5,032 of which were born before January 26th 2010 and subsequently referred to UNHCR as a potential caseload/persons of interest who may fall under UNHCR mandate.


When asked about remaining family members in the DR, 30,821 individuals (6,161 claimed deportees, 17,918 spontaneous returnees and 6,742 officially deported individuals) have indicated still having family members remaining in the DR. Further questioning regarding the status of these remaining families has revealed that 76.8% are Haitians without visa, 12.2% are Haitians with visa and 6.0% are Dominican citizens or have a Resident status.



Of the 26,892 households interviewed by the network, 2,043 households (representing – 7.6% of the returnee population) declared having been registered in the Dominican PNRE. Of these 2,043 households, 85.4% returned spontaneously to Haiti, 10.9% claimed to have been deported and 3.7% have been officially deported into Haitian territory.


A total of 11,024 persons have been officially deported at the official border crossing points of Ouanaminthe, Malpasse and Belladères and have been voluntary registered. Most of these deportations were conducted by DR immigration authorities (DGM). The majority of returnees are individuals and not households/families. Indeed, a total of 10,087 households corresponding to 11,024 individuals have been officially deported.


Of all the 11,024 individuals officially deported, 95.3% were male and 4.7% were female. The majority of the officially deported individuals have reported being between the ages of 18-59 years, individuals from this age group representing 93.8% of the deported population. A reported 5.8% are aged between 0-17 years old and a mere 0.4% falls into the elderly category. The average age of officially deported individuals is 26.50 years old.



Among the people officially deported, 450 were presumed unaccompanied minors (UAM). These presumed UAMs were referred to the relevant government authority (IBESR) and their partners for appropriated care and status determination.


Of all official deportations, 10,865 have reportedly been carried out by the General Directory of Migration (DGM in Spanish), 123 by the CESFRONT and 36 by the military.


When questioned about the location from which they were deported, the respondents have indicated the following:  9,675 individuals apprehended in the street  677 were apprehended in their residence  620 were apprehended in their place of employment.


A reported 6,622 of officially deported individuals have indicated still having family members remaining in the DR. They have indicated the following:  5,130 have close relatives remaining  670 have children (daughter/son) remaining in DR  609 have their spouse (husband/wife) still in DR.