On Thursday, Haitian ambassador to Mexico, Guy Lamothe, accompanied with the Mayor of Tijuana, Juan Manuel Gastelum, as well as officials of the Secretary of Foreign Affairs, the National Institute of Migration (INAMI), visited one of the largest community of Haitian immigrants in Mexico.

The visit was part of a larger effort by the Mexican government to highlight its recent steps to deal with the unprecedented number of Haitian nationals who came from Brazil in the hope of getting an asylum in the United States, but are now stuck at the border since Donald Trump has taken office as President of the US.

On this occasion ambassador Lamothe shared brief moments with a group of Haitian women and men from the Salesian Breakfast Room, where they receive a place to sleep and medical attention.


Haitian Ambassador oversees treatment of compatriots

"My visit is to see the treatment that my compatriots are receiving from the authorities of Tijuana and to evaluate the integration of these people into society," said the ambassador of Haiti. 

"We are here to sensitize the Haitians to come to immigration to regularize and to take advantage of the time they are in Tijuana, because it is a global city and Haitians must take advantage of this space." 

For Mexican immigration officials, the objective of the meeting is to work hand in hand with the various governmental entities and in an organized way, continue to support the Haitian community and encourage them to regularize, so they can have legal documents, education, a sense of belonging and a more solid future in the workplace.

"Tijuana is a city complemented by a cultural mosaic, it is a noble land that shelters and welcomes, the situation that we live is seeing as an area of ​​opportunity, we want to do what is necessary to include these people to the productive life and this way we can grow together, "said the mayor to those present.

"We have greatly appreciated the humanitarian way they have received our compatriots from Haiti, in addition to the facilities they have shown to make them part of Mexico and the solidarity they show in making them feel more like one of them," emphasized the Haitian ambassador , Guy Lamothe to reporters as he was leaving.

According to the Federal Ministry of the Interior, some 3,700 Afro-descendant migrants, mostly from Haiti, remained permanently in the state, especially in Tijuana.